Seniors need to just say “no” to online dating scams

After years of dating frustration, Montana resident Debbie Best thought her luck had finally changed when she met a handsome antiques dealer from Florida through an online dating site. But then her newfound boyfriend started asking for money. A lot of it. In , the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center received 5, complaints from victims of so-called “romance scammers” — criminals who scan online dating sites, chat rooms and social networking sites for potential victims. In a typical con, the perpetrator will spend weeks or even months building up a romantic relationship with a victim through e-mails, texts or phone calls, before eventually asking for money. And many of the scammers aren’t even in the United States. Debt collection horror stories For Best, it all started when she signed up for a free online dating site called mingle2. A man calling himself “John” messaged her and through daily phone calls and messages on Facebook, he gained her trust.

How to Spot an Online Dating Scam

After a rough divorce the year before, she was thrilled to meet a man who shared her religion, interests, and love of children and animals. Then one day Eric called in a panic, saying his passport had been stolen. Candace wired him the small sum without hesitation — but when he contacted her a few weeks later saying he needed a much bigger sum to pay legal bills, she realized she was being scammed. Her whole relationship with Eric was a scheme to get money out of her.

Some women are using dating apps to scam money off men (Getty Images/iStockphoto) How women are using their Tinder matches to scam money off men One user has received money .

This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. The time between the funds appearing as available to the account holder and the check clearing is known as the “float”, during which time the bank could technically be said to have floated a loan to the account holder to be covered with the funds from the bank clearing the check. Even after it has cleared, funds may be reclaimed much later if fraud is discovered.

The check given to the victim is typically counterfeit but drawn on a real account with real funds in it. With correct banking information a check can be produced that looks genuine, passes all counterfeit tests, and may initially clear the paying account if the account information is accurate and the funds are available. However, whether it clears or not, it eventually becomes apparent either to the bank or the account holder that the check is a forgery. This can be as little as three days after the funds are available if the bank supposedly covering the check discovers the check information is invalid, or it could take months for an account-holder to notice a fraudulent debit.

It has been suggested that in some cases a genuine check, from the payer’s account, is issued with intent to defraud: Regardless of the amount of time involved, subject to certain limits, once the cashing bank is alerted the check is fraudulent, the transaction is reversed and the victim’s account debited; this may lead to it being put in overdraft. Western Union and MoneyGram wire transfers[ edit ] A central element of advance-fee fraud is the transaction from the victim to the scammer must be untraceable and irreversible.

Otherwise, the victim, once they become aware of the scam, can successfully retrieve their money and alert officials who can track the accounts used by the scammer. Wire transfers via Western Union and MoneyGram are ideal for this purpose.

How to Spot an Online Dating Scammer

Embassy in Paris receives many inquiries from people who have been defrauded for hundreds and sometimes thousands of dollars by Internet contacts they thought were their friends or loved ones. Internet con artists try to convince you to send them money. In many cases, scammers troll the Internet for victims, and spend weeks or months building a relationship.

Once the victim becomes suspicious, the individual may cut off contact. Before you send any money, check to see if you recognize any of the following signs that you may be a potential victim of a scam: Photographs of the scammer show a very attractive person, and appear to have been taken at a professional modeling agency or photo studio.

Online Dating Cons and Scams. Updated on February 9, Marcy Goodfleisch. They are quite good at appearing honest and innocent, and extremely skilled in conning people out of their money, their virtue and their dignity. Here are some common tricks used by professional scammers, and ways to avoid getting into their traps.

Debbie Shall Nov 21, “Thank you. This basically is what I have been going through, only I haven’t been asked for money yet. He has sent me 3 gifts from Shutterfly with a picture of him and his daughter. Your advice tells me it might be a scam. Stout Jun 6, “It’s true people. I am currently playing along with a scammer who is pretending to be a beautiful woman who is very much in love with me. But had to go take care of mum in Africa. She says I’m so handsome I’m not and wants to see me in person and hear me.

Scams That Pull At Your Heart

Stolen images[ edit ] Falsified passport used in an actual internet romance scam. The deception is obvious to observers, but often ignored by willing victims. This is often known as catfishing. This might be for requests for gas money or bus and airplane tickets to travel to visit the victim, medical expenses, education expenses etc.

An advance-fee scam is a form of fraud and one of the most common types of confidence scam typically involves promising the victim a significant share of a large sum of money, in return for a small up-front payment, which the fraudster requires in order to obtain the large sum.

A new study has raised concern, as more children are talking to and meeting people they meet online, with dangerous consequences. When Morrison suggested that her suitor put his daughter on a plane to get better medical attention at home — and even offered to pick the girl up at the airport — a new crisis struck. By then, Morrison knew she was dealing with a scammer. Though the amounts and details of the scam vary from victim to victim, when it comes to romance scams, the con is almost always the same: The crook wants to get a besotted victim to wire money or provide access to a credit card.

If the victim doesn’t figure out the con after the first request for cash, the crook will keep milking the relationship for as much as he or she can get. When the victim gets wise, the con artist gets scarce. To be sure, these scams aren’t new.

FACT CHECK: Nigerian () Scam

Citizen Services Romance Scams U. Correspondents may cultivate the relationship for several months before asking for money, but if they are after your money, eventually they will ask for it. Before you send any money to Ghana, please take the time to do your research and inform yourself. Start by considering the fact that scams are common enough to warrant this warning. Next, look over this partial list of indicators.

A string of scams are taking place asking people to make payments over the phone for things such as taxes, hospital bills, bail money, debt collection, and utility bills. The scams are committed using many methods, including gift cards.

From Prima Unfortunately, in this digital day and age, there is an ever increasing need to protect yourself against financial scams. Financial fraud is the most common crime in the UK and, it turns out, the methods scammers use can change very quickly, which is why NatWest has released their Digital Safety report for which details the techniques some scammers will be using this year, in particular. Joining up with research agency The Future Laboratory, the bank has analysed data from RBS Scams Monthly Index and the RBS security team over the past 18 months to predict eight fraudulent scams expected to rise this year.

Social Media We’re often told to be mindful of just how much personal information we give out on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram but sometimes we don’t even realise we’re doing it. By innocently moaning about your utility provider or publicly celebrating the new home you’ve bought, you could be giving fraudsters snippets of information which could lead to them having enough information on you to try and trick you. What can you do to protect yourself? Be cautious on social media by making your profile private, remember just because someone knows your details it doesn’t mean they are genuine and if you’re wary of unexpected calls hang up and call the company on a trusted number.

Smartphone software Criminals often use ‘malware’ malicious software , which can be unknowingly downloaded onto a device and used by the criminals to spy on the user’s browsing habits. Up until recently, malware has been associated with laptops and PCs but there’s a high chance it can now be downloaded onto smartphones. Keep updating your mobile’s operating systems so they have the latest security features and upgrades. Also, think carefully before ‘jailbreaking’ a device as this may weaken the security and finally only download apps through official means like Apple’s app store, Microsoft App Store and Google Play.

Bogus ‘Brexit’ investments Criminals are also using world events to target consumers, it seems.

Army CID warns against romance scams

Scams, unfortunately, are a way of life. Every great leap forward in communication technology is usually accompanied by an equivalent leap forward in scam technology. Or think of it this way — scams take time and money to set-up and pull off. You might be saving yourself a huge headache down the road. Like a lot of these scams, the first line of defense should always be skepticism and a quick Google search.

Millions of Americans use dating sites, social networking sites, and chat rooms to meet people. And many forge successful relationships. But scammers also use these sites to meet potential victims.

History[ edit ] The modern scam is similar to the Spanish Prisoner scam which dates back to the late 18th century. In exchange for assistance, the scammer promised to share money with the victim in exchange for a small amount of money to bribe prison guards. There are many variants of the letters sent. One of these, sent via postal mail, was addressed to a woman’s husband, and inquired about his health. According to Cormac Herley, a Microsoft researcher, “By sending an email that repels all but the most gullible, the scammer gets the most promising marks to self-select.

They refer to their targets as Maghas, slang developed from a Yoruba word meaning “fool” and referring to gullible white people. Some scammers have accomplices in the United States and abroad that move in to finish the deal once the initial contact has been made. The details vary, but the usual story is that a person, often a government or bank employee, knows of a large amount of unclaimed money or gold which he cannot access directly, usually because he has no right to it.

The money could be in the form of gold bullion , gold dust, money in a bank account, blood diamonds , a series of checks or bank drafts, and so forth. The sums involved are usually in the millions of dollars, and the investor is promised a large share, typically ten to forty percent, in return for assisting the fraudster to retrieve or expatriate the money. Although the vast majority of recipients do not respond to these emails, a very small percentage do, enough to make the fraud worthwhile, as many millions of messages can be sent daily.

To help persuade the victim to agree to the deal, the scammer often sends one or more false documents which bear official government stamps , and seals. Often a photograph used by a scammer is not a picture of any person involved in the scheme.

Woman Discovers She Has Spent $1.4 Million in Possible Love Scam — Dr. Phil